Can Horses Eat Cucumbers?

Last Updated on December 3, 2020 by Woody Pet

The Why and How of Cucumbers as Horse Treats – Can Horses Eat Cucumbers?

Many horse owners constantly search the internet and even consult experts, about the right food items to feed their horses. Aside from doing the right precautionary measures to avoid any risks to a horse’s health, horse owners also want more variation in the snacks for their adored equines. 

With this motivation, the question, “Can horses eat cucumbers?” is a good subject to begin about. “Why cucumbers?” you might contemplate when other healthful options are more traditional – like carrots and apples. Backtracking to the contrasting flavors and nutritional values that equines’ diet require, cucumbers can actually be turned into your horse’s new favorite treat.

Cucumbers, like any other vegetables, are loaded with the nourishment that horses need. What’s more, is that it’s safe to consume for most of our equine friends. Thus, here’s a comprehensive guide to why and how can cucumbers be introduced as a new nutritious treat to horses.

A Guide to Feeding Cucumbers to your Favorite Herbivores

Why Cucumbers? – Trying Different Horse Edibles

When you’re feeding the same treats to your horses all the time, there are two possible outcomes. Either that food item will be their new favorite, or they’ll eventually get tired of it. But even if it becomes their favorite, it won’t be a healthy routine for them anyway. That’s why you should consider trying cucumbers as treats for horses. 

Are cucumbers safe for horses? Yes, cucumbers are one of the foods horses can eat that doesn’t have much effect on their sensitive diet. Unlike when you found the answer to whether can horses eat peppers or potatoes, considering cucumbers don’t have that sort of threat because it’s not a member of the nightshade family of plants.

Furthermore, not only are cucumbers safe for horses, but they also have the nutritional advantage that you can’t get from most vegetable selections. Its impressive water percentage will hydrate your gentle equines on a scorching summer day. The sugar content of cucumbers is also not threatening to horses who have metabolic issues or insulin resistance.

Feeding Cucumbers to Horses – Can Horses Eat Cucumbers?

The case in question on whether are cucumbers safe for horses is straightforwardly settled. It has vitamins, minerals, and also harmless to equines with weight gain problems. Promptly, you might be curious now how can you prepare cucumbers for horses’ consumption.

It’s honestly simple and you’ve probably done the same thing for other food items you’ve tried feeding your horses before. Above all, you should wash cucumbers first. We want to avoid those nasty chemicals and pesticides. To be extra sure, you can grow cucumbers in your own garden instead, or buy ones with the organic label.

Acknowledging the answer to the in-case can horses eat cucumbers raises more questions on how you should prepare it. The majority of horse owners would agree that it should be chopped into pieces that prevent choking hazards. Feeding cucumbers with the peel on to your horses has the benefit of more fibers. Although it’s up to you and your favorite herbivores on how they would like to ingest it.

Similar Choices – Alike Vegetables You Can and Can’t Feed to Horses

While wondering if can horses eat cucumbers, you must have thought of other alternatives as healthy horse treats, including the inquiry on whether can horses eat zucchini. Cucumber and zucchini are two vegetables from the gourd family, and zucchini poses no threats to horses’ health.

With that, can horses eat zucchini? Definitely. You can prepare it as to how you would prepare cucumbers for horse consumption. Washing it well is always applicable. Both the cucumber and zucchini are common garden vegetables, and other garden vegetables must have been under consideration too when you thought about similar choices alike to such options.

Going back to the curiosity if it allows that can horses eat peppers, one more similar plant to avoid are tomatoes. A helpful fact to remember when tending to the care for horses is that any plant from the nightshade family is a red flag. Just stick the usual treats you give to your horses if you’re really unsure.

Caution and Risks – Regulation is Always a Must

No matter what food items you feed to horses, regardless if it’s safe or not, it all boils down to keeping the amount in check. We’ve assured how are cucumbers safe for horses, but it doesn’t mean we can allow horses to freely relish it.

Because of the high potassium levels of cucumbers, overfeeding can lead to intestinal gas. If left unattended, this can lead to equine colic. Moreover, because horses are physically incapable of two-way food transport in their esophagus, it’s possible that a gastric rupture occurs.

However, these risks are not specific to cucumbers and it should be considered more of a general precaution. There should be no severe problems as long as you maintain a minimum cucumber ingestion per week. The ideal amount is 1 to 2 whole cucumbers that aren’t fed in one go. After all, the vegetables mentioned are supposed to be treats, not alternatives to horse feeds.

Summarizing The Why and How

After knowing what goes along with feeding cucumbers to horses, it’s safe to assume that this vegetable selection is fairly a good food item to try. Horses are gentle animals who will accept what’s offered to them depending on their liking. 

Thus, when trying something new like cucumbers, it would be best to let them get accustomed to it. Many fruits and vegetables out there are packed with vitamins and minerals necessary to maintain the balanced diet of equines. Some are safe enough for them to relish, while some may impose toxicities. 

In spite of either case, it’s all up to us to regulate the food of horses for their safety, and this new knowledge on whether can horses eat cucumbers is just one of many options. Just remember that anything too much will never be good for the well-being of horses, thus feeding them the right way is a must.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Related Articles